Inequality and social contract

Report

Inequality and social contract

Luis Ayala Cañón, coordinator;

The general aim of this book is to offer an accurate portrayal of the extent of inequality in Spain, its determining factors, and the policies necessary for reducing it. Sharing this goal with other prior studies, its main contribution is the construction of a narrative to explain to society how we have reached this point. Through its different chapters, we have tried to express what can be done and what difficulties Spain’s society faces in defining a social contract that would enable the problem of inequality to be tackled with adequate measures.
Key points
  • 1
       Why should social and economic inequality matter to us?
  • 2
       What are the causes of current inequality?
  • 3
       What are we going to find in this book?

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