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Vocational Training in Catalonia: academic performance, dual VET, and gender

Toni Mora, IRAPP, Universitat Internacional de Catalunya; Josep-Oriol Escardíbul, IEB, Universitat de Barcelona; Pilar Pineda-Herrero, EFI, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
This project has received the support of RecerCaixa, a programme promoted by the "la Caixa" Foundation with the collaboration of the ACUP

This article draws together the main conclusions of a report on the situation of Vocational Training (VET) studies in Catalonia based on administrative data from the academic years 2015-2016 to 2018-2019. Specifically, data have been analysed pertaining to 263,487 students, as well as 3,441 teachers, from 457 public training centres.
Key points
  • 1
       Opting for Dual VET (medium and higher cycles) increases the grade achieved by 0.51 points and the probability of gaining a qualification by 1.8%.
  • 2
       Being female increases by 12% the probability of completing the full training course.
  • 3
       Females achieve an average final grade 0.3 points higher than that of males.
  • 4
       Females continue opting for more socially-oriented courses. While 11.2% of males choose IT, only 0.9% of females do so.
  • 5
       VET students tend significantly to be older than the age forecast for this type of studies (an average age of 20.6 years for the intermediate cycle and 23.8 years for the advanced cycle).
  • 6
       In overall terms, there are only 12% of foreign students.
  • 7
       The assessment by work experience tutors is higher when the percentage of female participants is greater.
  • 8
       Computer programmers (67%), science technicians (65%) and IT operations technicians (59%) are the occupations considered most necessary for the year 2030.
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