Are immigrants more ambitious than their non-migrant compatriots?

Javier G. Polavieja, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid
María Ramos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid
Mariña Fernández-Reino, migration Observatory (Oxford)

There is no universal pattern in immigrant selection. In other words, in some cases migrants are more oriented towards success than their compatriots who did not migrate, whereas in other cases they are less success-oriented than the latter.
Key points
  • 1
       It is often argued that immigration leads to a draining of talent and entrepreneurship in countries of origin.
  • 2
       This study analyses whether immigrants in different European countries are more oriented towards success than their compatriots who did not migrate by looking at three areas: orientation towards success, towards risk and towards money.
  • 3
       There is no universal pattern in immigrant selection, which in some cases is positive and in other cases, negative.
Motivational orientations of migrants and of their compatriots who did not emigrate
Motivational orientations of migrants and of their compatriots who did not emigrate

On average, the migrants of the set of countries score higher than their non-migrant compatriots on scales of orientation towards success, towards risk and towards money. However, although in some origin/destination combinations positive selection in these motivational traits is maintained (for example, in Europeans resident in other countries of the eurozone that share a common language), in other combinations the opposite occurs, such as for example in the case of Europeans from Eastern Europe in other countries in the of the European Union, or Moroccans in the case of Spain or Turks in the wealthy European countries.

Classification

Authors

Javier G. Polavieja , Universidad Carlos III de Madrid
María Ramos , Universidad Carlos III de Madrid
Mariña Fernández-Reino , migration Observatory (Oxford)

Tags

Subject areas

Related content

Activity

Series of seminars at CaixaForum Macaya: “Technology, Business and new Cities”

Is it necessary to humanise technology more? In this seminar series that we are organising with the Knowledge Innovation Market Bcn (KIMbcn) Foundation, we will be debating on how the digital transformation should contribute towards achieving social and environmental goals.

Infodata

Digital Economy and Society Index

Spain stands at the head of the countries of the EU-27 in the global computation of digital society indicators (connectivity, Internet use, etc). Portugal, however, is situated at the tail end.

Infodata

Demographic determinants

Population changes can occur due to variations in the population caused by natural changes and migratory movements.

Infodata

Human capital formation

Rate of early leavers from education and training in Spain and EU-27.

Infodata

Inequality in income distribution

The redistributive effect of social transfers is lower in Spain than in the EU-27.

You may also find interesting

Infodata

Percentage of people who view themselves as above their parents or grandparents on the social ladder

Percentage of people who view themselves as above their parents or grandparents on the social ladder

Social Inclusion

Some 29% of Spaniards have a social position above that of their parents, and over 40% believe they have risen above their grandparents on the social ladder.

Infodata

Number of generations necessary so that those born in families with low incomes can reach the average level of income in their society

Number of generations necessary so that those born in families with low incomes can reach the average level of income in their society

Social Inclusion

In Spain, according to this indicator, it takes four generations to improve the incomes of families with precarious finances.

Infodata

Fertility rate

Fertility rate

Social Inclusion

The fertility rate in Spain is 1.23 children per woman, the second lowest rate among European Union countries.