Article

Work-family balance in the summer, a bad deal for women

Proyect selected in Call to incentivise the dissemination of research in the Social Sciences

Almudena Moreno Mínguez, UVa; Raquel Llorente Heras, UAM; Diego Dueñas Fernández, UAH; Adapted by: Laia Brufau and Eli Vivas (StoryData)

How do families solve the problem of balancing work and family life when school finishes for the summer? Mothers bear the brunt in the job sphere, which causes probable negative consequences for them in the short and the long run.
Key points
  • 1
       Women in Spain move from employment to inactivity in the summer more than men do.
  • 2
       Para las mujeres, la atención de las distintas cargas familiares es una razón muy importante para pasar a la inactividad en verano, mientras que para los hombres es un motivo de mucho menor peso.
  • 3
       For women, attending to the various family obligations is a very important reason for moving to inactivity in the summer, whereas for men it is a less powerful reason.

Many women become economically inactive in the summer (neither work nor look for a job) to reconcile their time with their family’s needs. This may entail various risks of an occupational nature, such as fewer professional opportunities, worse wage prospects and a less secure work future.

Using data obtained from the Economically Active Population Flow Statistics (Estadística de Flujos de la Población Activa or EFPA) published by the National Statistics Institute (INE), the analysis conducted for this study shows that, in the summer, women move from employment to inactivity more than men do. Between 2010 and 2019, an average of 325,730 women transited to inactivity in the third quarter of the year, while only 220,260 men took this option. What appears to be a solution to the problem of work-family balance actually becomes an ineffective solution, as it generates a bigger problem in the long run: it causes career stoppages among women and reduces their real and potential wages on the Spanish labour market. Furthermore, it is important to note the root of the ineffectiveness of this solution: at present, the women who leave the labour market in the summer have a more solid professional background than the men who move from employment to inactivity.

Classification

Tags

Subject areas

Related content

Article

The impact of gender-based violence on sons and daughters: the role of schools according to the pupils

Some 93% of children have heard of gender violence. Their preferential source of information is the school setting but, if faced with a situation of gender-based violence, they are unsure whether it would be the place to find help.

Infodata

PhD qualifications by different branches of knowledge and by sex

While the participation of female PhD holders in Portugal is situated above the EU‑27 average in all fields of knowledge considered, in Spain the participation of female PhD holders is situated below the European average in the fields of art, humanities and social sciences.

Article

Why are there fewer women in manual occupations?

Two out of every three workers in manual occupations are men, and women continue to be a minority in occupations such as construction, and industry. What factors influence segregation by gender in the labour market?

Article

Do women have fewer opportunities to be hired?

An experiment in gender discrimination confirms that, under equal conditions, women have 30% fewer probabilities of being invited to a job interview.

Infodata

Dependence for personal care

How many people aged over 65 years have difficulties in performing some of the basic activities of everyday life? In our country, 33% of people aged over 65 years have problems washing themselves independently.

You may also find interesting

Percentage of people who view themselves as above their parents or grandparents on the social ladder

Infodata

Percentage of people who view themselves as above their parents or grandparents on the social ladder


Social Inclusion

Some 29% of Spaniards have a social position above that of their parents, and over 40% believe they have risen above their grandparents on the social ladder.

Number of generations necessary so that those born in families with low incomes can reach the average level of income in their society

Infodata

Number of generations necessary so that those born in families with low incomes can reach the average level of income in their society


Social Inclusion

In Spain, according to this indicator, it takes four generations to improve the incomes of families with precarious finances.

Fertility rate

Infodata

Fertility rate


Social Inclusion

The fertility rate in Spain is 1.23 children per woman, the second lowest rate among European Union countries.